CHUSS SEMINAR 2019: Friday 29th March 2019, 2:00PM

Date

Friday, 29 March 2019

Event Details

The College of Humanities and Social Sciences (CHUSS), Makerere University invites you to the 2nd CHUSS Seminar 2019 on Friday 29th March 2019 at 2:00pm.

Venue: SWGS Conference Hall

Topic: Contesting Borders of Responsibility for Justice: Transnational Migration and Lived Critique of Injustice

Presenter: Dr. Zuzana Uhde

Brief Bio about the Presenter

Zuzana Uhde, PhD specializes in social and feminist theory and research of global interactions. Particularly she focuses on the research of transnational migration in relation to global justice and sub-Saharan Africa, transnational care practices and geopolitical economy. She works as a researcher at the Institute of Sociology of the Czech Academy of Sciences. She is an editor-in-chief of the academic journal Gender a výzkum / Gender and Research (www.genderonline.cz) and a research fellow in the research programme Global Conflicts and Local Interactions (Strategy AV21). Uhde received her PhD in sociology from the Charles University in Prague. She has held Fulbright fellowship at the University of California, Berkeley, USA and other fellowships in Brasil, Hungary, Slovakia, Lithuania and France. In 2018/2019 she is a visiting research fellow at the Makerere University in Kampala, Uganda. Contact: zuzanauhde@gmail.com

Abstract

Migration is a topic that resonates today in public debates. However, what is often omitted in the migration studies as well as public debates are the structural causes of migration – transnational conflicts, wars, global economic inequalities, etc. – and proposed solutions thus stay on the surface. The presentation will focus on transnational political economy of migration by studying structural causes of transnational migration driven by global capitalism. Such analysis shed light on key shortcomings of today’s global geopolitical regime. The author argues that transnational migrants represent a structural group of people who find themselves in a similar position in relation to social structures of current global economic architecture even though they do not necessarily have a collective identity. Although migrants’ lived critique does not take the form of traditional political protest, understanding marginalized migrants as a structural group supports more ambitious claims for global justice. In the following step, the author discusses the methodological and practical limits of the current nation state-defined framework of responsibility for global justice which does not respond to structural causes of transnational migration and reproduces the internal contradictions of the international human rights regime. Following her critical analysis, she focuses on the possibilities of extraterritorial obligations for justice, which are partly embedded in the current international law. Then she outlines an argument for a differentiated responsibility for global justice.

You are all welcome!

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