Crop Production, Gender Roles and the Use of Mobile Phones and Radios for Agricultural Information by Farmers in Apac District, Northern Uganda

TitleCrop Production, Gender Roles and the Use of Mobile Phones and Radios for Agricultural Information by Farmers in Apac District, Northern Uganda
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2019
AuthorsMpiima, DMugambe, Manyire, H, Kabonesa, C, Espiling, M
JournalScientific Research Publishing
Volume7
Issue3
Abstract

The introduction of information communication technologies like mobile phones and radios as a form of agricultural extension has the capacity to alter household gender roles. The information access that was previously more available to men than women, has the capacity to empower farmers by improving their ability to turn food crops into market oriented crops. This implies that food crops, previously seen as women’s crops, also become cash crops, which were thought to be men’s crops. This change also leads to changes in agricultural gender roles. The anticipated increase in agricultural productivity also leads to men or hired labour participating in agricultural roles that were previously thought to be women’s roles, so as to meet the market demands in a timely manner. The dual purpose of the crops leads to more joint labour provision along the agricultural production process and blurs the gender divide. The study used a sequentially mixed methods’ approach among farmers belonging to five farmer groups in Apac district in Northern Uganda. The study indicated that the use of mobile phones in agricultural production altered agricultural gender roles, as well as the participation of women and men in the production of food crops and cash crops. The changes greatly benefited women farmers as they moved into commercial production alongside their husbands, which changed their socio-economic status. The use of mobile phones and radios is important in fostering the participation of both men and women in agricultural roles that they previously did not engage in, since there is limited monopoly of information once a couple navigates issues of power relations surrounding the access to and use of the technologies.

URLhttps://www.scirp.org/journal/PaperInformation.aspx?PaperID=90997
DOI10.4236/jss.2019.73007